American holocaust chapter summary. Essay about American Holocaust: American History 2019-01-10

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American Holocaust

american holocaust chapter summary

But again, since numbers such as these are so overwhelming, sometimes it is the smaller incident that best tells what it was like—such as the expedition to Nicaragua in 1527 of Lopez de Salcedo, the colonial governor of Honduras. It needs to be taught. A recent national study highlighted that the highest percentage of U. Admitting that the next step is wrong implies that the last step was wrong, and thus any attempt to do what is right means that you have already done something wrong. Like other people in the Americas, and unlike the Spanish, the natives of Hispaniola had no previous exposure to the virus—nor to the numerous other diseases that historically, in other parts of the world, had spread from domesticated animal hosts.

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Chapter 1

american holocaust chapter summary

This in spite of the fact that, as Stannard points out, the native Americans were already using the land: it's just that they did not use it in the exploitative way the settlers believed to be their duty. After this, Danny walks out. It is an ideology that remains dangerously alive today, he adds, and one that in recent years has surfaced in American justifications for large-scale military intervention in Southeast Asia and the Middle East. He wants to prove that he is more than just a tour guide. Stannard reveals that wherever Europeans or white Americans went, the native people were caught between imported plagues and barbarous atrocities, typically resulting in the annihilation of 95 percent of their populations. All 'civilized' manners functioned properly within the Holocaust.

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Everything is Illuminated Chapter 1 Summary and Analysis

american holocaust chapter summary

Hitler did this to the Jews as he wanted the world to have the Aryan race with the Holocaust, and America did this to the Japanese during the Japanese internment. Stannard writes about the nature of life and society in the New World before the coming of Columbus, the Conquest that followed the arrival of Columbus, the attitude taken toward the Native Americans by Europeans after this, and the idea that what occurred should e classified as genocide. An excellent and essential read for anyone wishing to better understand the preconditions, execution and perpetual extension of racist, dehumanizing and ultimately genocidal motivations. The majority did not die there, but were separated from their children, taken to their homes in groups, and killed, the majority apparently with machetes. He sees the African American as standing helpless, and dismayed before the nameless prejudice that becomes expressed in the all pervading desire to inculcate disdain for everything black. A book that took a long time to finish.

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American Holocaust Prologue

american holocaust chapter summary

Chapter 2 In an introductory account that covers the pre-contact Indians that ranges from a treatment of Mississippian to Anasazi cultures and up to California, Stannard impresses the reader with the diversity of native civilizations. As difficult as it was to read this history, I feel like this is a book every American should be required to read. The conquerers of North and South America brutally carried out genocide on the native people in the name of God and the search for gold. Stannard argues that by targeting women and children, the Europeans were conducting genocidal warfare. It's the least compelling section, but necessary structurally for the rest. Here, I will focus here on the first two sections of the book. The word modern is indeed used here after a serious thought.

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Essay about American Holocaust: American History

american holocaust chapter summary

An astute analysis of the greatest holocaust of A far reaching codex permeated with a means of humane thinking and rationale that shall one day serve as a bedrock for ancient and enduring knowledge regarding the human condition. Columbus remained ill for months while his soldiers wandered freely. Stannard begins with a portrait of the enormous richness and diversity of life in the Americas prior to Columbus's fateful voyage in 1492. And indeed, the Aztec toll in that regard was great. This is the hypocrisy of Christians or simply Europeans. The slaughter had barely begun. These beautiful Japanese Americans are among the sixth largest Asian American communities.

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Morality

american holocaust chapter summary

Being of Native American heritage myself, I used to think that Columbus started the destruction but found that wasn't so. Kirch and Jean-Louis Rallu, eds. So it went, from island to island, small and large, throughout the Caribbean. With a conventionally estimated population of about 350,000 residents by the end of the fifteenth century, this teeming Aztec capital already had at least five times the population of either London or Seville and was vastly larger than any other European city. She scolds Alex constantly and tells him that doing things you hate for other people is what makes a family. Wherever the invaders went, the pattern was the same.

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Everything is Illuminated Chapter 1 Summary and Analysis

american holocaust chapter summary

Directly: Scientists tend to care more about their research projects than about the actions occurring in the world. After his second voyage and by 1496 from one-third to a half were subjected to slavery, slaughter, disease and ultimate death. They build from our desire to control and manipulate nature. Johnsbury, Vermont—a distance of less than 200 miles. A lesson in empathy and a masterwork of historiography and scholarly thinking.


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Chapter 3

american holocaust chapter summary

Advancing a thesis that is sure to create much controversy, Stannard contends that the perpetrators of the American Holocaust drew on the same ideological wellspring as did the later architects of the Nazi Holocaust. David in this book clearly documents as to how Europeans have emptied city after city by literally murdering every inhabitant — Children, women and men. Stannard documents the destruction of the Western Hemisphere's native population, and it is horrifying. In northern Mexico, over a somewhat longer period, the native population fell from more than 2,500,000 to less than 320,000. Immediately setting his slaves to labor in the placer mines, he drove them until they dropped. An object of the type that can be manipulated and killed. The rest is largely darkness, like the history of pre-European, pre-Columbian America.


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David Stannard

american holocaust chapter summary

Gold was all that they were seeking, so every Indian on the island who was not a child was ordered to deliver to the Spanish a certain amount of the precious ore every three months. Then, leaving them for dead, he stopped and threatened the same punishment if they tried it again. If you managed not to go on the train, someone else did. There must always be a welcome for books on the destruction of the Indians if they enhance our understanding of a complex historical phenomenon. At least 94 percent of the population was gone—somewhere between 8,500,000 and 13,500,000 people had been destroyed. During that time the native population of the Western Hemisphere declined by as many as 100 million people. But many of those men returned to the ships, having come down with the mysterious illness along the way.

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