How to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary. SparkNotes: To Kill a Mockingbird: Chapters 7 2019-01-06

How to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary Rating: 4,1/10 965 reviews

How to kill a mockingbird

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Shortly after Jem is relieved from duty, Mrs. Back at school, Scout works hard not to fight. Toward the end of the summer, Atticus catches Jem and Dill when they plan to leave a note on the window at the Radley house, inviting Boo out to have ice cream. Aunt Alexandra calls for the doctor, and Atticus calls for the sheriff. Readers get the impression that Uncle Jack is less upset by Scout's language than by the fact that a girl is using that kind of language. Jem cries because a silent friendship that was cemented figuratively through little gifts in a knothole has been ended — ended before he has a chance to say thank you — by someone else's decision to literally cement the tree. This world is still one in which men don't cry.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 8

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Again, this shows how a law, such as nature's law or even a personal law such as Atticus's avoidance of guns, must sometime be bent toward a higher aim. Oh, and meanwhile has shown up to teach the kids some family pride and, in Scout's case, ladylike behavior. Introduced in these chapters, the issue of femininity and women's roles in Maycomb society is a significant theme in To Kill a Mockingbird. Atticus tells Scout that he has to fight a battle he can't win because it is the morally correct thing to do. A hefty portion of the story focuses on prejudice and the relationships between African Americans and whites in the Southern United States in general, and Maycomb, specifically. Analysis The first chapter's emphasis on family history and stories within stories describes the rigid social ties that hold society together in the little town of Maycomb, Alabama, and the inescapable links that tie an individual to his or her family or clan.


Next

To Kill A Mockingbird Chapter 7 & 8 Summary

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

As they run, they hear a shotgun sound somewhere behind them. The ladies of Maycomb decide to organize a Halloween pageant in the high school auditorium this year. There is no one clear way to worship God, but the chapter suggests that reading the Bible inside all day may be an application of God's law which, like the hunting law when applied to the Ewell's, becomes self-defeating if applied too severely. When they arrive home, there are several adults gathered at their house including Miss Maudie, Atticus, and Stephanie Crawford, the neighborhood gossip. A patient and loving, if somewhat unusual, father, Atticus acts as the voice of reason for his children, and later the entire town. Chapter 3 Jem invites Walter Cunningham over for lunch when he finds out that the boy doesn't have any food. Throughout the story, Dill acts as an observant conscience for the town.


Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 8

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Through Tim Johnson, Jem and Scout gain further insight into their father, just as they will through Tom Robinson's trial. The sheriff notices knife marks on Scout's costume, and she understands that Bob Ewell had intended to kill her and Jem. The children also confront ugliness and hostility, only to find that the reason behind the behavior follows the ethical high ground. They make it look like Mr. With the return of summer also comes Dill's return.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird: Summary & Analysis Part 1: Chapters 8

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

The novel takes begins during the summer. Whenever strange things happen in the neighborhood, Boo is often blamed. In another nod to how their world is changing, Jem and Scout have a chance to meet Boo Radley, but are too absorbed in something else to notice. Scout is amazed that she was so close to Boo and didn't even know it. Scout and Jem's surprise helps readers understand this unfairness at a deeper level. As the men argue, Atticus realizes that Boo Radley killed Ewell, and it is Boo who Tate is trying to protect. By suggesting that a trail of candy will make Boo leave his home, Dill still applies methods that would appeal to children, not adults.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapters 7

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

The third and final summer chronicled in To Kill a Mockingbird begins in these chapters. To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 8 That winter an unusual thing happened in -- it snowed. As time passes, the old woman stops speaking and her mouth opens and closes while her head sways from side to side. This strong foundation provides an important starting point for the story. One's social survival depends on how well he or she follows the rules. At the sheriff's request, Scout recounts what happened, realizing that one of the strange noises she heard was Jem's arm breaking.

Next

Notes on Chapter 8 from To Kill a Mockingbird

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Miss Maudie loves to spend time outdoors. They're still terrified, however, by the mystery of Boo. Atticus explains that every lawyer gets at least one case in a lifetime that affects them personally, and that this one is his. Jem and Scout get permission to go sit with him that evening. Jem's reaction to cementing the knothole would've been entirely different had Mr. She and Dill are posted as guards, while Jem tries to deliver the note, but Atticus intervenes, telling the children to leave the Radleys alone. However, Miss Maudie's description of his tale helps to humanize him.


Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Dill, a child who has not yet reached Scout's level of acceptance about societal prejudices, reacts strongly to the lack of respect African Americans are shown. Standing alone on the porch, Jem stands on a threshold between indoors and outdoors, between childish freedom and the inside civilized world of adults. For instance, Walter Cunningham, like his father, is polite, self-effacing, and unwilling to accept charity. Reverend Sykes gives a sermon, which seems similar to the sermons Scout is used to, except that he makes examples of particular people in the congregation to illustrate his points. Summary Scout, the narrator, remembers the summer that her brother Jem broke his arm, and she looks back over the years to recall the incidents that led to that climactic event.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird Chapter 14

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

Granted, Calpurnia is more educated than the majority of her peers, but it still seems unusual that she doesn't want the children emulating that speech or those beliefs. The children hate her until the moment Atticus explains her bravery to them. How he handles each situation gives true insight into his moral code. Dubose has a strange fit. In some ways their snowman is analogous to the way blacks are treated in Maycomb. Analysis The oak tree with the knothole is in the Radley yard, and after Mr.

Next

To Kill a Mockingbird

how to kill a mockingbird chapter 8 summary

One night Scout remembered that she wanted to ask Atticus what Rape meant. Unsurprisingly, Scout is as unhappy in second grade as she was in first, but Jem promises her that school gets better the farther along one goes. In the American South during this time period, segregation was the law. First, she's trying to expose the injustice in whites' treatment of blacks. The title of To Kill a Mockingbird is explained in Chapter 10. The novel begins with the events leading up to this moment, and Jem emerges as a mature adolescent well on his way to being a fine, respectable man, just like his father.


Next